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Elizabeth Anna (Mursener) & Louis Michael Fischer

Louis Michael (1890 - 1954), Carl's father, was in the first generation to be born in America. Born twenty years after the Fischers' arrival, he was the youngest son of Michael Ludwig by far: His siblings, Karl and Nicolaus were born in 1874 and 1876. By the time of Louis' birth, the Fischers had established themselves as a prominent, pioneer family in the township, as respected merchants and community leaders. Karl was a trained pharmacist with a retail practice; Nick followed in his father's business.

Louis married Elizabeth Anna Mursener who was a ribbon clerk at a local shop when they met. He claimed that "Lizzy"was the prettiest girl in all Kewanee. He began his career in his Uncle John's bank as a clerk and purchased a bungalow on Division St. where he started his family: sons Nicolaus, Paul and Carl. 

When the post-World War I era ushered in the 1920 enactment of Prohibition, Louis' career took another path. In the tradition of his entrepreneurial family, he launched a new retail enterprise. On a downtown street, he opened a "smoke shop," selling tobacco, pipes, and cigars. In the back of the shop and down a staircase, he ran a pool hall and speakeasy until the repeal of prohibition in 1933. This proved to be a lucrative business, with liquor supplied by local stills that had ready access to corn sugar.

Louis' family moved to a large, two-story house on Prospect St., where he raised his three sons who benefitted from the prosperous and roaring '20s. His older sons owned cars and attended private colleges, out of state. Louis joined his Fischer relatives at their lakeside cabin for hunting and fishing. He enjoyed many status symbols of his lifestyle: hunting dogs, prize animals, and horses. He was able to pursue his lifelong passion of owning, racing, and breeding thoroughbreds for harness racing at Midwest county fairs. Regardless of the Crash of '29 or the repeal of Prohibition in '33, Louis continued to race his horses, earning many trophies. 

Louis not only raced, but bred and trained harness racers, a money making venture. His stable colors were bright green and gold. Once his grandchildren were born, Louis named a racing horse after each one: Michael F., Katie F., and Rusty F. for John. But of all his racers, Katie F. was the champion and earned many trophies before being put out to pasture to breed at the Moore stables.

It appears that Louis raced trotters, not pacers.